As an herbalist I continue to grow and guide myself along a path full of learning, sharing, safety and healing. I am currently studying to become an associate member of the Veterinary Botanical Medicine Association and a professional member of the American Herbalist Guild. 

In being a general member of the guild, I have the utmost respect for their mission to support and guide herbalists with a code of ethics.

dog herbalist
We have a Cockapoo who developed allergies with secondary chronic ear infections and a rash on his stomach when he was about one year old. We took him to our veterinarian where he would receive antibiotics, antifungals and steroids. These would make the infection go away for a month or so and then the ear infection would start back up again. We did this for almost a year until we met Rita.
— Rob and Jo Hovancsek, Olympia, WA

The Herbalist Way

A overview of the guiding principals of herbal medicine is wonderful as a foundation for herbal education but the most beneficial practice you can get is meeting the plants and getting to know them personally.  Some of the best herbalists in the world have been self-taught or have apprenticed under other herbalists.  The sharing of information and practice techniques is a rich way to learn and understand the herbs that you are drawn to.  Studying herbs and working with them lasts a lifetime.

For me, I have found my niche in being a canine herbalist and focusing on the plants and foods most beneficial to dogs and their relationship to the natural world.

Dogs are a huge part of my life and using herbs and holistic medicine to help heal them and create vibrancy was a natural progression. Fusing herbal medicine with my experience with dogs has grown into a consulting practice that I truly love and share with others as much as I can.